What is a Resale S-1 Registration Statement?

In a Resale S-1 Registration Statement, securities previously acquired privately are registered for resale to the general public.

Who are the Selling Shareholders in a Resale S-1?

In a typical example, investors in a company’s Private Placement (“PPM”) are told that their shares will be “registered for resale” at a later date.  In a Resale S-1, these investors are referred to as “Selling Shareholders”, and their names are listed in a table, along with the number of shares, and an explanatory note detailing the method and date of purchase.  The PPM Offering Documents, including a Subscription Agreement, are usually included in the Resale S-1 as Exhibits.

In another example, shares previously awarded to consultants, founders or employees for services can also be registered for sale in a Resale S-1.  The supporting documentation showing the origin and history of those shares would likewise be included as Exhibits.

All of this Selling Shareholder documentation is reviewed by the company’s PCAOB auditor so that the cost basis, and value of consideration is included in the audit.

What Makes a Resale S-1 Different?

The main difference in a Resale S-1 is when the Selling Shareholders sell their shares, they keep all of the money from the sale,  and the company does not receive any funds.   Even so, the company typically pays for the cost of the Resale S-1 Registration Statement, including the audit.

How Does a Company Benefit from a Resale S-1?

One way a company benefits from a Resale S-1 is by demonstrating to future PPM investors that the company keeps its promise to later register shares.   It also benefits the company by creating a “Float.”  The Float is the block of non-affiliate, free trading shares available to trade “on the market.”

In order to justify the expense of preparing a Resale S-1, a company will typically also register a certain number of new S-1 shares itself.  When the company sells these newly registered S-1 shares to the public, the company keeps those funds.

Private Placement followed by IPO and Resale S-1 Combination

One of the most common strategies for going public on the OTC Bulletin Board or OTC Markets via S-1 Initial Public Offering (“IPO”) is to file a new S-1 Registration Statement following a Private Placement Offering.  This S-1 registers both new shares for the company to sell, and also includes Selling Shareholders who bought stock in the Private Placement (“PPM”).

Many companies use the strategy of filing a quick PPM for friends and family before filing an S-1 Registration Statement as way of obtaining some of the 35 non-affiliate shareholders Market Makers are looking for prior to sponsoring the company for a ticker symbol under 15c211.  This also helps to defray some of the administrative costs associated with going public.

In order for this strategy to be effective, the PPM documents and consideration needs to be in order so that the company’s PCAOB auditor can efficiently include the Selling Shareholders into the S-1 audit.  An experienced OTC securities attorney can help companies do both a PPM and a Resale S-1 from start to finish.

Securities Attorney for Private Placements and S-1 Resale Registrations

Matt Stout is a securities attorney focused on taking companies public on the OTC Bulletin Board and OTC Markets.   When companies engage Matt Stout as securities counsel, the PPM to S-1 process is handled efficiently and all representation is under an agreed-upon flat fee, which includes responding to all SEC Comment Letters.

Companies interested in learning more about Private Placement Offerings and S-1 Registration Statements can contact Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. for a no cost consultation at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.