Tag Archives: Section 4(a)(1) attorney

Selling Stock in Former Shell Companies Under Rule 144

Rule 144 is the most common exemption from registration of microcap stock, and is often cited by securities attorneys in legal opinions used to deposit restricted shares in OTCMarkets companies.

However, Rule 144 can never be used if the Issuer is currently a shell company.  If the Issuer is a former shell, Rule 144 can only be used by a shareholder if certain conditions apply.  These requirements for former shells are known informally as “The Evergreen Rule.”

What are the Requirements of the Evergreen Rule under Rule 144?

  1. The Issuer of the securities must have ceased to be a shell company;
  2. The Issuer must be “subject to” the reporting requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”).  This means the Issuer must be a “mandatory SEC filer” or “fully reporting.”;
  3. The Issuer must have filed all reports and other materials required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, during the last 12 months, other than Form 8-K reports; and
  4. The Issuer must have filed current ‘‘Form 10 information.”  This includes audited financials and could be done in a Form 10, but is more likely achieved in a combination of other SEC filings, including a “Super 8-K.”

If the foregoing requirements of the Evergreen Rule are met, then Rule 144 might be available, subject to all other applicable Rule 144 conditions, such as Affiliate status, and holding period.

Section 4(a)(1) Alternative to Rule 144 for Current and Former Shells

In many cases, the requirements of the Evergreen Rule cannot be met.  For instance, if an Issuer is currently marked a shell company, or if a former shell is delinquent in its SEC filings, then Rule 144 cannot be used.   If the securities are greater than Two (2) Years old, Section 4(a)(1) may offer a solution.

Requirements of Section 4(a)(1) Legal Opinions

Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. drafts Section 4(a)(1) legal opinions for shareholders who are not “issuers, underwriters or dealers.”   Because shell status is not an element of Section 4(a)(1), these legal opinions can issued for Non Affiliate shareholders in current shells or former shell companies.

Current information is also not an element of Section 4(a)(1), such that these opinions can also be drafted even when the Issuer is delinquent in its filings, and marked as a Yield Sign or Stop Sign at OTCMarkets.com.

Section 4(a)(1) is concerned with the shareholder, rather than the Issuer.   Section 4(a)(1) opinions cite case law extensively and are typically much longer than the average Rule 144 opinion, as they go into great detail when examining whether or not a shareholder can be classified as an issuer, underwriter, or dealer in securities.

Securities Attorney Drafting Section 4(a)(1) Opinion Letters for Shareholders

Shareholders with stock in current or former shell companies quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board or OTC Markets can contact OTC securities lawyer Matt Stout for a no cost review of their certificate and supporting documents at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

 

 

What is Tacking Under Rule 144?

Tacking under Rule 144 allows a holder of restricted securities to aggregate the separate holding periods of prior holders in order to meet the Rule 144 holding period requirement.

Rule 144 Holding Periods:  Either Six Months or One Year

The holding period for mandatory SEC filers is 6 months.  These are fully reporting Issuers filing 10-K, 10-Q and 8-Ks and “subject to” the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

In contrast, the Rule 144 holding period for voluntary SEC filers and non-reporting Pink Sheets is 12 months.

Rule 144 Tacking is Allowed for Restricted Stock and Convertible Debt

Tacking is used for both restricted stock, and for convertible promissory notes, as well.

For example, if a Note is documented at over a year old, the Rule 144 holding period is likely met even if the Note holder converts into common stock immediately prior to seeking a Rule 144 legal opinion.  This is because the Note holder is allowed to tack the age of the Note onto the age of the newly issued stock to meet the 12 month holding period.

Tacking Under Rule 144 is Only Permitted to Non Affiliates

By permitting tacking, the SEC allows a selling security holder to include the holding period of a prior non-affiliate holder.   However, if the securities were purchased from an affiliate, tacking is not permitted and the holding period starts over.

For example, if a non affiliate shareholder who owned stock in an SEC mandatory filer for seven months sells stock in a private Stock Purchase Agreement to a new non affiliate shareholder today, the new shareholder has already exceeded the 6 month holding period.

Removing the restricted legend on the stock will require the new shareholder to provide documentation which shows the origin and history of the shares, including the prior holder’s purchase date and non affiliate status.

OTC Securities Lawyer Answers Rule 144 Questions on Tacking

Shareholders with questions regarding tacking under SEC Rule 144 or Section 4(a)(1) can contact OTC Bulletin Board and OTCMarkets securities attorney Matt Stout at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

Tacking of Rule 144 Holding Periods for Distributions of Stock

Do pro rata distributions of restricted stock from a corporate entity shareholder to its individual shareholders affect the Rule 144 holding period?

No.  Under Rule 144(d), the holding period of the corporate entity shareholder may be tacked onto the holding period of an individual shareholder who receives the distribution of restricted stock.

Documenting the Origin and History of Rule 144 Restricted Stock

In order for a Rule 144 opinion letter to be issued by an experienced OTC Markets Pink Sheet and Bulletin Board securities attorney like Matt Stout, the shareholder must provide documentation showing the origin and history of the shares.  The main task of an OTC securities lawyer issuing Rule 144 legal opinions is to confirm when and how the securities were first issued, and then to track every transaction from that point forward.

Rule 144 Securities Attorney Matt Stout Drafts Legal Opinions for Shareholders

OTC securities lawyer Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. reviews documents at no cost in preparation for drafting legal opinions under Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1) for Pink Sheets and OTCMarkets OTCQB stocks.   Shareholders can email certificates and Rule 144 documentation to mstout@otclawyers.com or call Matt Stout at (410) 429-7076 to discuss Rule 144 and clearing restricted stock.

Rule 144 Holding Period for Shares Issued Per Anti-Dilution Rights

When does the Rule 144 holding period begin for shares received due to anti-dilution rights?

For purposes of Rule 144(d), additional shares of stock acquired from an Issuer pursuant to anti-dilution rights have the same holding period as the original shares governed by the anti-dilution provision.   Another way of saying this is that the new shares can tack onto the holding period of the old shares.

Shareholder Opinion Letters for OTC Markets and Bulletin Board Stocks

OTC securities attorney Matt Stout drafts Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1) opinion letters for Shareholders of Pink Sheet and Bulletin Board companies trying to clear and sell restricted stock.

Questions regarding Rule 144 holding periods, shell status or Section 4-1 alternatives to Rule 144 can be emailed at mstout@otclawyers.com or (410) 429-7076.

How is the Six Month Holding Period Computed under Rule 144(d)(1)(i)?

For mandatory SEC filers, the Rule 144 holding period is Six (6) Months.  This means that under Rule 144(d)(1)(i), a minimum of Six (6) Months must pass from the date restricted securities are acquired from an Issuer or from an Affiliate of the Issuer, whichever is later (the “Acquisition Date”) and any resale of the restricted securities under Rule 144 (the “Resale Date”).

What is a Mandatory SEC Filer?

The Six (6) Month holding period only applies to mandatory SEC Filers.  A mandatory SEC filer is a public company that is, and for at least the immediately prior 90 days, has been subject to the reporting requirements of Exchange Act Section 13 or 15(d).

What is the Acquisition Date for the Purposes of Rule 144?

The Acquisition Date is the date on which the restricted securities were acquired by being “paid for” or “fully earned.”  This is often much earlier than the date of a stock certificate.

How to Calculate the Rule 144 Holding Period in a Debt Conversion

For shares originating in a debt conversion, Rule 144 allows tacking onto the holding period of a Promissory Note.   In that case, the Acquisition Date would be the later of the date of Note, or the date funds were paid to the Company in the form of wire transfer or check, if the Note is evidence of a loan.   The Acquisition Date could then be years before a Notice of Conversion or a stock certificate was even issued.

How to Calculate the Rule 144 Holding Period for a Subscription Agreement

For stock purchased from the Issuer via Subscription Agreement, the Rule 144 holding period will begin on the later of the date the Subscription Agreement was countersigned, or on the date the Shareholder purchased the shares via wire transfer or check.  That is, a Shareholder cannot start the Rule 144 holding period merely by promising to buy shares by signing the Subscription Agreement–the shares must be paid for.

How to Calculate the Rule 144 Holding Period for a Consulting Agreement

For stock awarded as compensation under a Consulting Agreement, when the Rule 144 holding period would start depends on the language of the document and when the services were provided.  The shares awarded under a Consulting Agreement must be “fully earned” by providing services.

In some cases, the document itself will specify the “term” or period of time in which services are to be provided, and the rate at which a number of shares is earned.  In cases where the document was vague, confirmation from the Company’s CEO or confirmed by correspondence between the parties or Transfer Agent can be used to verify when the shares were considered “fully earned.”

Rule 144 Legal Opinions by OTC Securities Lawyer Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq.

OTC Securities attorney Matt Stout reviews documents at no cost for Shareholders seeking legal opinions under Rule 144 or Section 4(a)(1).   Shareholders who want to clear and sell restricted stock, or who want to remove the restricted legend from securities can contact OTCLawyers at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

What is the Rule 144 Holding Period for a Warrant Exercise?

Rule 144 Holding Period for Cashless Warrant Exercise

If the exercise of a warrant is “cashless” then a Shareholder is allowed to tack the holding period of the warrant onto the common stock under Rule 144(d)(3)(x).  This means that as long as there is no consideration whatsoever paid in order to exercise the warrant, the holding period of the common stock will tack back to the date of the warrant itself.

Rule 144 Holding Period for Warrant Exercises Upon Payment of Cash

In contrast, if the warrant exercise is not “cashless”, then the holding period will begin on the date of the warrant exercise.

De Minimus Payments to Exercise Warrants Under Rule 144

This is true even if the payment to exercise the warrant is “de minimis.”  That is, even if the amount paid to exercise the warrant is a very tiny amount of cash, the Shareholder will be prevented from tacking the holding period of the warrant to that of the common stock under Rule 144(d)(3)(x).

No Cost Review of Documents by Rule 144 Legal Opinion Lawyer Matt Stout

Shareholders in need of Rule 144 or Section 4(a)(1) legal opinions can contact OTC Bulletin Board and OTC Markets securities attorney Matt Stout for a no cost review of documents at (410) 429-7076 or via email at mstout@otclawyers.com.