Tag Archives: s-1 registration

What is a Resale S-1 Registration Statement?

In a Resale S-1 Registration Statement, securities previously acquired privately are registered for resale to the general public.

Who are the Selling Shareholders in a Resale S-1?

In a typical example, investors in a company’s Private Placement (“PPM”) are told that their shares will be “registered for resale” at a later date.  In a Resale S-1, these investors are referred to as “Selling Shareholders”, and their names are listed in a table, along with the number of shares, and an explanatory note detailing the method and date of purchase.  The PPM Offering Documents, including a Subscription Agreement, are usually included in the Resale S-1 as Exhibits.

In another example, shares previously awarded to consultants, founders or employees for services can also be registered for sale in a Resale S-1.  The supporting documentation showing the origin and history of those shares would likewise be included as Exhibits.

All of this Selling Shareholder documentation is reviewed by the company’s PCAOB auditor so that the cost basis, and value of consideration is included in the audit.

What Makes a Resale S-1 Different?

The main difference in a Resale S-1 is when the Selling Shareholders sell their shares, they keep all of the money from the sale,  and the company does not receive any funds.   Even so, the company typically pays for the cost of the Resale S-1 Registration Statement, including the audit.

How Does a Company Benefit from a Resale S-1?

One way a company benefits from a Resale S-1 is by demonstrating to future PPM investors that the company keeps its promise to later register shares.   It also benefits the company by creating a “Float.”  The Float is the block of non-affiliate, free trading shares available to trade “on the market.”

In order to justify the expense of preparing a Resale S-1, a company will typically also register a certain number of new S-1 shares itself.  When the company sells these newly registered S-1 shares to the public, the company keeps those funds.

Private Placement followed by IPO and Resale S-1 Combination

One of the most common strategies for going public on the OTC Bulletin Board or OTC Markets via S-1 Initial Public Offering (“IPO”) is to file a new S-1 Registration Statement following a Private Placement Offering.  This S-1 registers both new shares for the company to sell, and also includes Selling Shareholders who bought stock in the Private Placement (“PPM”).

Many companies use the strategy of filing a quick PPM for friends and family before filing an S-1 Registration Statement as way of obtaining some of the 35 non-affiliate shareholders Market Makers are looking for prior to sponsoring the company for a ticker symbol under 15c211.  This also helps to defray some of the administrative costs associated with going public.

In order for this strategy to be effective, the PPM documents and consideration needs to be in order so that the company’s PCAOB auditor can efficiently include the Selling Shareholders into the S-1 audit.  An experienced OTC securities attorney can help companies do both a PPM and a Resale S-1 from start to finish.

Securities Attorney for Private Placements and S-1 Resale Registrations

Matt Stout is a securities attorney focused on taking companies public on the OTC Bulletin Board and OTC Markets.   When companies engage Matt Stout as securities counsel, the PPM to S-1 process is handled efficiently and all representation is under an agreed-upon flat fee, which includes responding to all SEC Comment Letters.

Companies interested in learning more about Private Placement Offerings and S-1 Registration Statements can contact Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. for a no cost consultation at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

Overview of the SEC’s Comment Letter Process

What is the Purpose of the SEC Comment Letter Process?

The goal of the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance is to ensure that investors are provided with material information to make informed investment decisions.  One method the SEC uses to achieve this goal is to issue SEC Comment Letters when a company’s disclosures or financials in SEC filings need correction or require further explanation.

Through the SEC’s filing review process, SEC staff monitors and selectively reviews company filings posted under the Securities Act of 1933 and Securities Exchange Act of 1934 in order to “enhance compliance with disclosure and accounting requirements.”

The SEC focuses on disclosures that appear to be inconsistent with SEC rules or recognized accounting standards, or those which appear “to be materially deficient in their rationale or in clarity.”

What is an SEC Comment Letter?

SEC Comment Letters follow a consistent format, using numbered paragraphs that quote the specific language in an S-1 or other SEC filing which needs clarification.  While a S-1 Registration Statement is being reviewed, these SEC Comment Letters are not available to the public.  After an S-1 is declared Effective, all SEC Comment Letters become visible on SEC.gov and are marked UPLOAD.

How Does a Company Respond to an SEC Comment Letter?

A company’s securities attorney then helps the company respond in the same format, listing each comment and reply by number, in a question and answer (“Q&A”) fashion, so that each numbered paragraph is addressed in order.

After an S-1 Registration Statement becomes Effective, these response letters from the company or its securities counsel are also visible on the SEC’s EDGAR system under CORRESP meaning “correspondence.”  At the same time a company responds to SEC Comments, it also amends its S-1 or other SEC filing using the guidance provided by the SEC Comments, and those amendments are likewise posted to EDGAR.

When Does the SEC Issue Comment Letters?

After an S-1 Registration Statement is filed, initial SEC Comments are issued within Thirty (30) Days and often in as few as Two (2) Weeks.  Depending on the nature of the S-1, including the company’s business model and the complexity of its financials, there can be several rounds of SEC Comments, and company responses, which help an Issuer to refine disclosures and explain financials.

The SEC Comment Letter process is expected when a company files an Initial Public Offering (“IPO”) in an S-1 to first sell securities to the public.   There is nothing inherently bad about receiving an SEC Comment Letter.  An experienced securities compliance attorney can help companies use SEC Comments as guidance to make their SEC filings more transparent and easier to understand.

In addition to the expected SEC Comments to an S-1 filing or to any other Registration Statement, the Division of Corporation Finance can technically also issue an SEC Comment Letter for any public company filing an 8-K, 10-Q or 10-K report on SEC.gov if there are questions.

Securities Attorney  for Responding to SEC Comments

Securities lawyer Matt Stout represents OTC Bulletin Board and OTC Markets companies in responding to SEC Comments on S-1 Registration Statements and any Securities Act or 34 Act filings.  Companies seeking guidance on going public by filing an IPO via S-1, or those in receipt of an SEC Comment Letter can contact Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. for a no cost consultation at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

 

 

 

 

 

S-1 Registration under the Securities Act of 1933

An S-1 Registration Statement is the most common way for a microcap company to “go public.” The S-1 is filed under the Securities Act of 1933, which has two primary goals:

  1. To require that companies provide the public with financial and other significant information concerning securities offered for sale; and
  2. To prohibit “deceit, misrepresentations, and other fraud” in the sale of securities to the public.

The SEC accomplishes these goals by requiring companies to disclose important financial information through the registration of securities following a specific format, such as the S-1.

S-1 Registration Statements for Companies Going Public

More microcap companies have success “going public” on the OTC Bulletin Board and OTC Markets by filing an S-1 Registration Statement than by any other method.

The SEC reviews S-1 Registration Statements to make sure they provide transparent disclosure of important facts and audited financials so that the public is informed of all risks involved in investing in an S-1.

The process of preparing, filing and amending an S-1 based on SEC comments is well known by experienced microcap securities lawyers, like Matt Stout.

What Information Does an S-1 Registration Statement Include?

A properly documented S-1 Registration Statement will provide the SEC with all of the necessary facts, including:

  1. A description of the company’s assets, operations and business model;
  2. A description of the security, such as common stock, to be offered for sale;
  3. Information about management, including the officers and directors of the company; and
  4. Financial statements certified by a PCAOB auditor.

It is important to note that the SEC does not have minimum asset or operations requirements for a company to go public via S-1.   Even start up companies with no revenue and few assets are eligible to file an S-1 Registration Statement.  The only requirement is that the company’s audited financials and disclosures accurately reflect the truth.

SEC Comments and Amendments to an S-1 Registration Statement

An S-1 Registration Statement, including its disclosures, audited financials, and prospectus, becomes visible to the public on SEC.gov as soon as it is posted via the SEC’s EDGAR filing system.

The SEC’s Division of Corporate Finance reviews the S-1 within 30 days of filing and provides SEC Comments, which are requests for clarification and further information.   The company then revises its S-1 Registration Statement to answer the SEC’s questions by filing an S-1/A amendment on SEC.gov.   The SEC Comments, along with a company’s responses, are also made available to the public on SEC.gov after an S-1 is declared Effective.

The SEC Comment and S-1 Amendment process continues for as many rounds as necessary until the SEC is satisfied that the company’s disclosures and financials are clear and understandable to the public.  Once the SEC has approved the last S-1/A, the company files a Request for Acceleration and their S-1 is made Effective.

After the S-1 is Effective, the company’s securities lawyer works with a Market Maker who sponsors the company under 15c211 to obtain its FINRA trading symbol or “ticker.”

S-1 Lawyer Helps Microcap Companies Go Public on the OTC Markets

S1 attorney Matt Stout drafts and amends S-1 Registration Statements for microcap companies and start up entrepreneurs seeking to go public on the OTC Bulletin Board (OTCBB) or OTC Markets (OTCQB).  The S-1 process is handled under an agreed upon flat legal fee, that includes responding to all SEC comments and as many S-1/A amendments as are necessary for the S-1 to be declared Effective.

As part of the S-1 process, companies are introduced to all other service providers needed, including a PCAOB auditor, Transfer Agent, EDGAR filer, and Market Maker who sponsors the company for its FINRA trading symbol after the S-1 is declared Effective.

Entrepreneurs interested in learning more about going public via S-1 Registration Statement can contact OTC securities attorney Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com for a free consultation.

 

 

 

Graphics Used in S-1 Registration Statements

Many companies filing IPOs to go public on the OTC Bulletin Board or OTC Markets using S-1 Registration Statements choose to include text or artwork inside the front and back cover pages of the prospectus.

Graphics are permitted in an S-1 Registration Statement, subject to certain best practices.

  1. Registrants should refer to Rule 304 of Regulation S-T to ensure that the graphics are in compliance;
  2. The graphic presentations must accurately represent their actual current business;
  3. Graphics must not depict products that do not exist or are not the Registrant’s actual products;
  4. Registrants cannot include testimonials or statistical data that are taken out of context; and
  5. Registrants should not identify specific customers that are not representative of the registrant’s overall customer base;
  6. Graphics should not use industry jargon or terms that are unfamiliar to the average investor;
  7. The graphic presentation should not include extensive narrative text that repeats information already contained in the Summary or Business Overview sections;
  8. Graphic presentations cannot be confusing or obscure other Prospectus disclosures, and
  9. No graphic presentation should give prominence to selected portions of the Registrant’s business or operations.

S-1 Attorney Offers No Cost Consultations to Discuss Going Public

Microcap companies and entrepreneurs seeking to go public on the OTCQB or OTCBB via S-1 Registration Statements can contact OTCMarkets securities attorney Matt Stout for a free consultation at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

What is the S-1 Quiet Period?

The S-1 “Quiet Period,” starts when a company files an S-1 Registration Statement with the SEC and ends when the SEC staff declares the S-1 “Effective.”

During the S-1 Quiet Period, the federal securities laws place certain limitations on what information a company can release to the public. Companies that fail to comply with S-1 Quiet Period may be found to be “gun-jumping.”

Well-Known Seasoned Issuers and the S-1 Quiet Period

Well-known seasoned issuers, (“WKSI”) include those household names every investor recognize trade on the NYSE or NASDAQ.  They are in the regular habit of releasing news anyway and are thus permitted anytime to use oral and written communications, including a “free writing prospectus,” subject to enumerated conditions (including, in some cases, filing with the Commission).  WKSI are eligible to file a Form S-3 rather than an S-1.

No OTC Markets or OTC Bulletin Board company is going to fall under the category of a Well-Known Seasoned Issuer, and all Issuers with stock quoted on the over-the-counter markets should be especially careful with all communications during the S-1 Quiet Period.

SEC Reporting Issuers and the S-1 Quiet Period

All SEC reporting issuers are permitted to continue publishing or posting regularly released factual business information and forward-looking information.  This applies to those already public companies that are filing an S-1 Registration Statement after already having a trading symbol or “ticker” and after already being subject to the reporting requirements of Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

This would not apply to a company which is doing its “IPO” or initial public offering, since by nature that company is private, and not yet “fully reporting” under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  That is, the Company is not yet releasing 10-K, 10-Q, and 8-K filings as required under the 34 Act.

Non-Reporting Issuers and the S-1 Quiet Period

Non-reporting issuers include both private companies filing an S-1 Registration Statement in order to “go public” on the OTC Bulletin Board (“OTCBB”) or OTCQB and those already public voluntary filers, Pink Sheet or Gray Sheet companies that are not SEC filers under the 34 Act.

These Non-Reporting companies can, at any time, continue publishing factual business information that is regularly released and intended for use by persons other than in their capacity as investors or potential investors.

Companies going public on the OTCBB or OTCQB by filing an S-1 Registration Statement should carefully consider the content and tone of all communications, whether they are news releases or simply posts on their blog or website.  Any reference to the the pending S-1 Registration Statement, the prospectus, or the offering, is a bad idea during the S-1 Quiet Period and may be considered “gun jumping.”

If Non-Reporting companies feel compelled to release any news during the S-1 Quiet Period they should have such news or press releases reviewed by experienced securities legal counsel prior to such releases.  S-1 lawyer Matt Stout can review news releases before they are posted.

Permitted Communications and the S-1 Quiet Period

The key issue to the S-1 Quiet Period is timing.   Communications by all Issuers more than 30 days before filing an S-1 Registration Statement will be permitted by the SEC so long as they do not reference a securities offering that is the subject of a pending or contemplated S-1 Registration Statement.

Companies planning to file an S-1 Registration Statement should review all of their past communications to see if they may have inadvertently run afoul of this 30 day guideline, and if so, should consult with an experienced S-1 lawyer like Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. to decide when the file their S-1 Registration Statement.

S-1 Lawyer Matt Stout Can Advise Companies on the S-1 Quiet Period

Companies interested in going public via S-1 or those public Issuers planning a resale S-1 to register securities already sold in a Private Placement can contact S-1 securities lawyer Matt Stout at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.