Tag Archives: 15c2-11

Do I Need 35 Shareholders Before Filing an S-1 Registration Statement?

No.  There is no minimum shareholder requirement to file an S-1.  Many startup companies with just one founding shareholder file S-1 Registration Statements as the first step to go public. So only one shareholder is required, along with audited financial statements, in order to file the S-1.

When are the 35 Shareholders Needed to Go Public?

The 35 shareholder requirement only applies at the time of the Company’s 15(c)211 application for a FINRA trading symbol, which a Market Maker does not sponsor until all SEC comments are cleared, and after the S-1 is declared Effective by the SEC.

Should a Company Acquire 35 Shareholders via Private Placement or After the S-1 is Effective?

While it is true that many companies acquire these 35 shareholders via Private Placement Memorandum (“PPM”) before the S-1 is filed, it is just as common for companies to sell free trading S-1 shares to friends, family and to the public as soon as the S-1 is declared Effective, in order to meet FINRA’s 35 shareholder threshold.

In many cases, it might be easier for the company to sell the S-1 shares after the Effective Date, since they are free trading and the investors may perceive less of a risk than buying restricted shares in the same company through a Pre-S-1 PPM.

The key is that those 35 shareholders are not required until sometimes months after the S-1 process is started, since the Market Maker cannot even sponsor the Form 15(c)211 application for the FINRA trading symbol until the S-1 is declared Effective.

Should We Delay our S-1 to Do a Larger Private Placement?

With that timing in mind, it makes little sense for private companies to wait forever to file their S-1 under the guise of attempting to sell more shares in a PPM.  Instead, some savvy companies considering an IPO via S-1 Registration Statement will use a Private Placement only to attract some already interested friends and family investors as shareholders so that they do not delay their S-1 audit.

Doing so allows those PPM friends and family shareholders to be listed in the S-1 as “Selling Shareholders” but also allows the S-1 audit to be completed without wasting a lot of time.   Since the audit is typically the most time-consuming part of the S-1, the sooner the PCAOB audited financials are ready, the sooner the company can go public.

OTC Markets Securities Lawyer for Companies Going Public

Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. is securities lawyer with a practice focused on taking microcap companies public on the OTB Bulletin Board and OTC Markets OTCQB.  Entrepreneurs with questions about taking a company public via S-1 can contact Matt Stout at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com for a no-cost consultation.

 

 

 

What is an SEC Trading Suspension?

The Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) has the authority to suspend trading in any stock for up to Ten (10) days when it believes that information about the Company may be inaccurate or unreliable.  Investors can search a list of SEC trading suspensions at SEC.gov.

Reasons the SEC Might Suspend Trading

  1. A lack of “current, accurate, or adequate” information about the public company–   If the Issuer is an OTCQB or OTCQX, this will cause OTC Markets to label it as a Pink Sheet until the filings are current.
  2. Questions regarding the accuracy of publicly available information–  This usually refers to press releases, but can also refer to periodic reports, like the 8-K, that mention financials, mergers or acquisitions.
  3. Trading in the stock–  A concern over insider trading or market manipulation involving email spam is often the cause.

Does trading automatically resume after the Ten Day Suspension?

Microcap stocks that are quoted on OTC Markets or on the OTC Bulletin Board (“OTCBB”) do not automatically resume trading following a 10 day SEC trading suspension.

In order for OTC Markets or FINRA’s OTCBB to resume quoting a suspended stock, the Issuer must have a market maker sponsor a new 15c2-11 filing.

Responding to an SEC Trading Suspension

SEC trading suspensions are valid tactics used by the Commission when there is a public interest concern over either a lack of information or the presence of new information that needs to be verified.

The proper response in either case is to make sure that the Issuer’s filings and press releases are current and accurate.  If a mistake was made, the Issuer should file an Amendment immediately.   Once the filings and news releases are current and accurate, then the next job for the Issuer’s securities counsel is to compile and present documentation which supports the statements made in the filings or news releases which caused the concern.

Public companies which post accurate new releases that state verifiable facts and avoid hyperbole should be able to produce supporting documentation within the 10 day SEC trading suspension, and after review by the SEC, the matter should end there.

While it is often true that an SEC review and response to such documentation could take longer than 10 days, and that a new 15c-211 filing may be inevitable, it is the Issuer’s responsibility to cooperate and assist the SEC in their investigation.   The sooner an Issuer provides documentation to the SEC, the sooner the trading suspension can be lifted.

Microcap public companies or shareholders with concerns over an SEC trading suspension or trading halt can contact securities lawyer Matt Stout at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

 

 

 

 

Do OTC Markets Issuers Need Audited Financials?

Public companies quoted on the OTC Markets OTCQX and OTCQB marketplaces require financials audited by a PCAOB auditor.  Those securities quoted on the OTC Markets Pink Sheet market tier do not required audits, though many Pink Sheets do have audited financials.

Audited Financials Not Required for Non Sec Reporting Companies

FINRA does not require the financial statements of Pink Sheets, which are not SEC reporting companies, to be audited for the Form 211 in the 15c2-11 process. Non SEC reporting companies are those that do not publish their financials and disclosures using the 10-Q, 10-K and 8-K using the SEC’s EDGAR filing system.

Unaudited Financials of US Issuers Must Be Prepared in Accordance with GAAP

However, OTC Markets Pink Sheet Issuers that are US companies should have financials that are prepared in accordance with GAAP. Foreign Issuers, meaning those Issuers that are incorporated offshore as opposed to US corporations that have business headquarters or operations outside of the US, are allowed to post financials that do not follow GAAP if they are prepared in accordance with their home country’s accepted accounting standards.

PInk Current Issuers Without Audits Require an Attorney Letter

Whether a US or foreign Issuer, a public company that wants to maintain Pink Current status on OTCMarkets.com will require an Attorney Letter  with Respect to Current Information at least annually, if they do not file reports with the SEC and do not publish audited financials. Companies that want to maintain Pink Limited Information (Pink Yield Sign) are not required to have audited financials.

Issuers with questions regarding PCAOB audits or questions about filing Form 15 with the SEC to transfer to the OTC Markets Alternative Reporting Standard (thus avoiding audits) can contact Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com.

How Does A Trading Halt Affect the OTC Issuer’s Stock?

Who Can Place a Trading Suspension or Trading Halt on an OTC Security?

Only the SEC or FINRA can suspend or halt trading in a public company’s stock quoted on the OTCQX, OTCQB or OTC Pink Sheet marketplaces.  OTC Markets does not suspend trading or stop publishing quotations for any Issuer on its own accord.

A trading suspension or halt has nothing to do with whether or not an Issuer has continued to subscribe to the OTC Markets Disclosure and News Service, to OTCIQ, or even if the Issuer’s filings are not current on OTC Markets.  Pink Sheet Stop Signs can, in theory, remain Pink No Information forever without having trading in their stock suspended or halted.

What happens if the SEC or FINRA Issues a Trading Halt in an OTC Markets stock?

When trading in an OTC stock is suspended by the SEC or halted by FINRA, OTC Markets Group removes all quotes from its inter-dealer quotation system and displays a “Halted/Suspended” message.

How Long Do Trading Suspensions Last?

SEC suspensions for OTC Markets OTCQX, OTCQB and OTC Pink Sheets last Ten (10) business days.

Once the suspension has ended, market makers may re-enter their bid and ask quotes if a new Form 211 is filed with FINRA that includes the Issuer’s current financial information.

Without the new 15c2-11, the trading symbol will remain a Caveat Emptor or skull and cross bones.

What Can Caveat Emptor Issuers Do About SEC Suspensions or FINRA Trading Halts?

Management or Shareholders of OTC Markets Caveat Emptor or skull and cross bones Issuers can contact Matt Stout, securities lawyer, with questions on the process of addressing SEC trading suspensions or FINRA trading halts, and to discuss the 15c2-11 process at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com