Tag Archives: 144 opinion letter

Rule 144 Holding Period for Stock-for-Stock Acquisitions

Reverse Mergers of OTC Markets microcap companies are typically achieved using a stock-for-stock exchange under which the public company issues restricted stock in exchange for the private stock of the company being “vended in.”

Holding Period of Private Company Stock Does Not Tack under Rule 144

Shareholders in the private company may have already held their private stock for many years prior to the reverse merger.  Thus these private shareholders are often under the mistaken but intuitive impression that they can tack their ownership of the stock in the private company prior to the reverse merger in order to meet the holding period requirement under Under Rule 144.   However, this is not true.

Rule 144 Holding Period Starts Upon the Closing of the Share for Share Exchange

In a stock-for-stock acquisition or reverse merger achieved via a share exchange, the date of closing determines when the Rule 144 holding period starts.  Why?  Because the shareholders receiving OTC Bulletin Board or OTC Markets Pink Sheet public company shares are not at risk until the transaction actually closes and the public company’s shares are actually issued in exchange for the private company’s shares.

The Date of the Merger Agreement Does Start the Rule 144 Holding Period

For example, if the closing of the reverse merger will be delayed until the private company’s financials are audited, then the date of the Merger Agreement or the 8-K announcing the proposed Merger will not determine the start of the Rule 144 holding period.

When the closing is delayed for any reason, the Rule 144 holding period for those receiving the public company’s stock will not start until the reverse merger closes because the recipients will not be at economic risk until that time.

Rule 144 Securities Attorney Opinions by Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq.

Rule 144 has many nuances and experienced securities attorneys issue legal opinions only after a thorough review of all shareholder documents and Issuer filings.   Shareholders seeking Rule 144 or Section 4(a)(1) legal opinions can email documents to OTC securities lawyer Matt Stout at mstout@otclawyers.com or call (410) 429-7076 for a no cost review.

Tacking of Rule 144 Holding Periods for Distributions of Stock

Do pro rata distributions of restricted stock from a corporate entity shareholder to its individual shareholders affect the Rule 144 holding period?

No.  Under Rule 144(d), the holding period of the corporate entity shareholder may be tacked onto the holding period of an individual shareholder who receives the distribution of restricted stock.

Documenting the Origin and History of Rule 144 Restricted Stock

In order for a Rule 144 opinion letter to be issued by an experienced OTC Markets Pink Sheet and Bulletin Board securities attorney like Matt Stout, the shareholder must provide documentation showing the origin and history of the shares.  The main task of an OTC securities lawyer issuing Rule 144 legal opinions is to confirm when and how the securities were first issued, and then to track every transaction from that point forward.

Rule 144 Securities Attorney Matt Stout Drafts Legal Opinions for Shareholders

OTC securities lawyer Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. reviews documents at no cost in preparation for drafting legal opinions under Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1) for Pink Sheets and OTCMarkets OTCQB stocks.   Shareholders can email certificates and Rule 144 documentation to mstout@otclawyers.com or call Matt Stout at (410) 429-7076 to discuss Rule 144 and clearing restricted stock.

Rule 144 Holding Period for Voluntary SEC Filers

What is a Voluntary SEC Filer?

A “voluntary filer” in a public company which continues filing SEC reports like the 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K, after its S-1 Registration Statement becomes effective, without technically being required to do so.

For the purposes of calculating a Rule 144 holding period, Voluntary SEC filers are not considered “subject to” the filing requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”) because they are not obligated to file Exchange Act reports under either of those sections.

Does Having an Effective S-1 Affect the Rule 144 Holding Period?

Having an S-1 Registration Statement, which is filed under the Securities Act of 1933, rather than under the Exchange Act, does not make a filer “mandatory.”  An SEC filer goes from “voluntary” to “mandatory” by filing certain Exchange Act forms, like the 8A-12g or the Form 10 Registration Statement.   These Exchange Act forms obligate the public company to file the 10-K, 10-Q, and 8-K, by making the company “subject to” the filing requirements of Exchange Act Section 13 or 15(d).

Mandatory SEC Filers Have a Six Month Holding Period Under Rule 144

The Six (6) Month holding period requirement in Rule 144(d)(1)(i) applies only to the restricted securities of a public company that is, and has been for at least 90 days immediately prior to the sale, “subject to” the reporting requirements of Exchange Act Section 13 or 15(d).

Voluntary Filers Have a One Year Holding Period Under Rule 144

Because of this distinction, the One (1) Year holding period requirement in Rule 144(d)(1)(ii) applies to the restricted securities of voluntary filers.

Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1) Opinion Letter Attorney Matt Stout

Shareholders in OTCQB and OTC Bulletin Board companies can contact Rule 144 and S-1 lawyer Matt Stout with questions on clearing and depositing restricted stock at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com for a no cost review.

What is the Rule 144 Holding Period for a Warrant Exercise?

Rule 144 Holding Period for Cashless Warrant Exercise

If the exercise of a warrant is “cashless” then a Shareholder is allowed to tack the holding period of the warrant onto the common stock under Rule 144(d)(3)(x).  This means that as long as there is no consideration whatsoever paid in order to exercise the warrant, the holding period of the common stock will tack back to the date of the warrant itself.

Rule 144 Holding Period for Warrant Exercises Upon Payment of Cash

In contrast, if the warrant exercise is not “cashless”, then the holding period will begin on the date of the warrant exercise.

De Minimus Payments to Exercise Warrants Under Rule 144

This is true even if the payment to exercise the warrant is “de minimis.”  That is, even if the amount paid to exercise the warrant is a very tiny amount of cash, the Shareholder will be prevented from tacking the holding period of the warrant to that of the common stock under Rule 144(d)(3)(x).

No Cost Review of Documents by Rule 144 Legal Opinion Lawyer Matt Stout

Shareholders in need of Rule 144 or Section 4(a)(1) legal opinions can contact OTC Bulletin Board and OTC Markets securities attorney Matt Stout for a no cost review of documents at (410) 429-7076 or via email at mstout@otclawyers.com.

 

 

What is a Penny Stock?

Penny Stocks are Quoted on the OTC Markets Pink Sheets

Penny Stocks are securities that are not listed on a national securities exchange like the NYSE or NASDAQ, and are also priced under Five Dollars ($5.00) Per Share.  The SEC’s definition of a Penny Stock is found in SEC Rule 3a51-1.  Penny Stocks are usually quoted on the over-the-counter (OTC) Markets on the Pink Sheets.  As a practical matter, most Penny Stocks trade well under a dollar, and many trade below a penny.

Penny Stocks Can Be Quoted on the OTCQB

OTCMarkets has three market tiers where OTC stocks are quoted.  These include Pink Sheets, OTCQB and OTCQX.  While stock price is a criteria for uplisting on the OTCMarkets.com to OTCQB, the minimum share price is One Penny ($0.01), well below the Five Dollars ($5.00) per share used by the SEC to define a penny stock. Since there is no minimum asset or revenue criteria for uplisting to the OTCQB, many OTCQB stocks are considered Penny Stocks.

OTCQX Companies Are Not Technically Penny Stocks

Stock price is not the only criteria for Penny Stocks. Although OTCQX, the highest market tier on OTCMarkets.com, has an initial minimum bid price criteria for US OTCQX companies of only Twenty-Five Cents ($0.25) and an ongoing minimum price of Ten Cents ($.10), OTCQX companies are not technically Penny Stocks because they meet at least One (1) of the exceptions to the Penny Stock Rule below.

Exceptions to the Penny Stock Rules

OTCQX securities are not Penny Stocks, because the criteria for quotation on the OTCQX requires these securities meet One (1) of these exclusions from the Penny Stock Rules:

  1. Net tangible assets  greater than Two Million Dollars ($2,000,000) if the company has been in operation at least Three (3) Years; or
  2. Net tangible assets of greater than Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000) if the company has been in operation less than Three (3) Years; or
  3. Revenue of at least Six Million Dollars ($6,000,000) for the last Three (3) Years.

Legal Opinion Letters for Shareholders with Restricted Penny Stocks

OTC Markets and Bulletin Board securities lawyer Matt Stout issues Rule 144 legal opinions and Section 4(a)(1) opinions for shareholders who own penny stocks and over-the-counter stocks, as well as OTC Markets Pink Sheets seeking to become current or to uplist on the OTCQB.

Contact OTCLawyers at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com today.