How Does a Foreign Private Issuer Go Public in the United States?

Foreign Issuers File F-1 Registration Statements to Go Public in the US

A Foreign Private Issuer (“FPI”) that wants to raise capital in the United States publicly for the first time must register its shares on SEC Form F‐1. An F-1 Registration Statement is similar to a Form S‐1 filed by US domestic Issuers in that it requires detailed disclosures about the FPI’s business operations and financials.

An experienced US securities attorney can help a Foreign Issuer draft an F-1 and respond to all SEC comments efficiently under a flat fee.  Once the F-1 is declared Effective by the SEC, a securities attorney can recommend a Market Maker to sponsor the Foreign Issuer for a FINRA ticker symbol so that its securities can be quoted on the OTCMarkets OTCQB or OTC Bulletin Board (“OTCBB”).

What Types of Securities Can a Foreign Company Register in the United States?

A Foreign Issuer may offer any type of securities that a US domestic Issuer is allowed to offer. In addition, an FPI may choose to offer its securities using American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”). Most Foreign Issuers will choose to register their Common Stock in an F-1 Registration Statement, just like a US domestic Issuer.

Securities Lawyer for Foreign Companies Going Public in the United States

Management of Non US domiciled companies seeking to become publicly traded in the United States can contact OTC securities lawyer Matheau J. W. Stout, Esq. to discuss the time frame and costs involved with going public on the OTC Markets or OTC Bulletin Board via F-1 Registration Statement.

Qualified Foreign Issuers can later uplist to the OTCQX, NASDAQ or NYSE MKT when appropriate.  Matt Stout can be reached at (410) 429-7076 or mstout@otclawyers.com for a free consultation.